TfL and Black Cultural Archives create first black history Tube map

Reimagined map replaces station names with notable black people from history.

TfL and Black Cultural Archives create first black history Tube map

Transport for London has teamed up with Black Cultural Archives to launch the first "Black history Tube map", celebrating the contribution black people have made to London and the UK.

The reimagined map replaces station names with notable black people from history, while Tube lines have been renamed to link individuals according to various themes – such as trailblazers, Georgians, sports, arts, LGBTQ+, physicians, performers, literature and community.

The map aims to highlight how black people have been intrinsic to all aspects of British life for thousands of years.

All 272 names and places featured on the "Black history Tube map" were researched by public historian Kelly Foster and Black Cultural Archives.

Figures include Cecile Nobrega, who replaces St Paul's station. Nobrega was an accomplished classical composer, poet, sculptor and educator who led a 15-year campaign to establish the Bronze Woman monument in Stockwell Memorial Gardens, the first public monument to black women to be on permanent display in England. Feminist, political activist and pioneering journalist Claudia Jones, who was the co-founder of Notting Hill Carnival, takes the place of Camden Town station. Joe Clough, who replaces Elm Park station, became London Transport's first black motorbus driver in 1910.

Marcia Williams, head of diversity, inclusion and talent at TfL, said: "Black people have played a significant role in all aspects of British life for thousands of years. From civil rights, art, and transport, to medicine and journalism. It is fantastic to see the true scale and breadth of this contribution commemorated on TfL's iconic Tube map – a symbol so synonymous with London and the UK."

Arike Oke, managing director of Black Cultural Archives, added: "London's Black history is deeply embedded in its streets and neighbourhoods. We're delighted, as part of our 40th-anniversary celebrations, to use this opportunity to share new and old stories about black history with Londoners and visitors to London. We hope that the map will be an invitation to find out more and to explore."

TfL has previously partnered organisations to produce reimagined Tube maps based on other themes, these include the London 2012 Games, the 150th anniversary of The FA, the Royal Observatory Greenwich and The Globe Theatre.