What tennis champ Ash Barty eats (and drinks) every day

To mark Indigenous Sport Month, Body+Soul caught up with tennis champion Ash Barty, 25, who is set to make her Olympic Games debut in Tokyo next month.

What tennis champ Ash Barty eats (and drinks) every day

To mark Indigenous Sport Month, Body+Soul caught up with tennis champion Ash Barty, 25, who is set to make her Olympic Games debut in Tokyo next month.

What does your day on a plate look like?

First up, it’s always coffee. When I’m at home [in Springfield, near Brisbane, where Barty lives with her partner, Garry Kissick, and their three dogs], I love making a good coffee on my machine.

Now I’m on the road [Barty is currently in Europe, where she recently withdrew from the French Open with an injury], I have a coffee plunger with me and I get my favourite coffee beans sent from Australia.

For breakfast at home, I usually have cereal with YoPRO high-protein yoghurt and some fruit; on the road, it’s something similar or eggs on toast. I usually train in the mornings, so I like to have a good breakfast with protein to fuel me for the day.

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Lunch at tournaments is usually whatever is going in the player cafe: sushi, a sandwich, or meat and salad.

For dinner, I usually like to have meat and vegies. When I can, I love to cook and eat at home; we have a lot of barbecues and easy meat-and-salad dinners.

I’m not a fussy eater – I eat pretty much everything.

What’s your advice for sticking to a healthy diet?

Everything in moderation and listen to your body. If I’m feeling run-down, I make sure I’m eating well and looking after myself by having plenty of fresh fruit and veg.

A steak or red meat usually helps when I’m run-down, too.

Travel is such a big part of the international tennis juggle. How do you prepare for long-haul flights?

Before a long-haul flight, I try to drink lots of water and have a good meal.

This year, being on the road has been a bit different to other years as we’re in a bubble environment and can only eat meals at the hotel, at the tennis courts or order delivery to the hotel.

We’re lucky the player cafes at the tournaments are generally very good and provide lots of healthy options for us.

With work, family and life commitments, a lot of us are time-poor. What advice do you have for eating meals on the go?

Try to choose healthy options if you have to eat out or get takeaway.

Read the food labels and understand what’s in your food. People are very health-conscious now and do want healthy options. There are so many great choices now on UberEats, so it’s possible to get a healthy takeaway dinner.

You have quite the passion for coffee and you’re a qualified barista. Where did this passion start?

My sister Sara and I did a coffee course a few years ago and loved it. I really enjoy the process of making coffee at home and learning more about how to craft the perfect coffee.

My signature brew is a skim cappuccino or a flat white. I’m OK but I’m still practising my barista skills.

I try to have a maximum of three or four coffees a day. It’s been hard this year with the restrictions but I’ve always loved finding great cafes overseas and trying the local coffee places wherever I am in the world.

Walking to the local cafe for a morning coffee on my own or with my team has become part of my routine on the road and a part of my day that I love.

What gets a thumbs down?

Seafood. I eat a little bit of it but it’s not my favourite food.

What’s one message you hope everyone reading this takes away?

Being healthy and happy are the most important things.

News Corp Australia is highlighting Indigenous Australians’ participation in sport through Indigenous Sport Month.